Open Data

In a previous post, several months ago, we talked about Chaos and the Mandelbrot Set: an innovation brought about by the advent of computers.

In this post, we’ll talk about a present-day innovation that is promising similar levels of disruption: Open Data.

Open Data is data that is, well, open, in the sense that it is accessible and usable by anyone. More precisely, the Open Definition states:

A piece of data is open if anyone is free to use, reuse, and redistribute it – subject only, at most, to the requirement to attribute and/or share-alike

The point of this post is to share some of the cool resources I’ve found, so the reader can take a look for themselves. In a subsequent post, I’ll be sharing some of the insights I’ve found by looking at a small portion of this data. Others are doing lots of cool things too, especially visualisations such as those found on http://www.informationisbeautiful.net/ and https://www.reddit.com/r/dataisbeautiful/.

Sources

One of my go-to’s is data.gov.uk. This includes lots of government-level data, of varying quality. By quality, I mean usability and usefulness. For example, a lat-long might be useful for some things, a postcode or address for other things, or an administrative boundary for yet others. This means it can be very hard to “join” the data together, as the way they store something like “location” is many different ways. I often find myself using intermediate tables that map lat-long into postcodes etc., which takes time and effort (and lines of code).

Another nice meta-source of datasets is Reddit, especially the datasets subreddit. There is a huge variety of data there, and people happy to chat about it.

For sample datasets, I use the ones that come with R, listed here. The big advantage with these is they are neat and tidy, so they don’t have missing values etc and are nicely formatted. This makes them very easy to work with. These are ideal for trying out new techniques, and are often used in worked examples of methods which can be found online.

Similarly useful are the kaggle datasets, which cover loads of things from US election polls to video games sales. If you are inclined they have competitions which can help structure your exploration.

A particularly awesome thing if you’re into social data is the European Social Survey. This dataset is collected through a sampled survey across Europe, and is well established. It is conducted every 2 years, since 2002, and contains loads of cool stuff from TV watching habits to whether people voted. It is very wide (ie lots of different things) and reasonably long (around 170,000 respondents), so great fun to play with. They also have a quick analysis tool online so you can do some quick playing without downloading the dataset (it does require signing up by email for a free login).

Why is Open Data disruptive?

Thinking back to the start of the “information age”, the bottleneck was processing. Those with fast computers had the ability to do stuff noone else could do. Technology has made it possible for many people to get access to substantial processing power for very cheap.

Today the bottleneck is access to data. Google is making their business around mastering the world’s data. Facebook and twitter are able to exist precisely because they (in some sense) own data. By making data open, we start to be able to do really cool stuff, joining together seemingly different things and empowering anyone interested. Not only this, but in the public sector, open data means citizens can better hold government officials to account: no bad thing. There is a more polished sales pitch on why open data matters at the Open Data Institute (and they also do some cool stuff supporting Open Data businesses).

Some dodgy stuff

There are obviously concerns around sharing personal data. Deepmind, essentially a branch of Google at this point, has very suspect access to unanonymised patient data. Google also recently changed the rules, making internet browsing personally identifiable:

We may combine personal information from one service with information, including personal information, from other Google services – for example to make it easier to share things with people you know. Depending on your account settings, your activity on other sites and apps may be associated with your personal information in order to improve Google’s services and the ads delivered by Google.

Source: https://www.google.com/policies/privacy/

We’ve got to watch out, and as ever be mindful about who and what we allow our data to be shared with. Sure, this usage of data makes life easier… but at what privacy cost.

allyourdataarebelongtous
PRISM

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